Our research encompasses a broad range of biogeographical subjects ranging from plant distributions and their geographical relationships with the environment to processes determining generation and spatial assembly of plant diversity. This includes aspects of evolution, ecology, and systematics as well as human-environment relations. Sound knowledge of basic principles of plant diversity on multiple levels, conceptual and methodological rigor in its study as well as a deep interest in plants motivate our teaching from the undergraduate to the postgraduate level. 

News & Recent Publications

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Press coverage "Invadors in Disguise": Heureka 1/17

New project on evolution of high mountain plants in Phyteuma (Campanulaceae) funded by FWF

Secondary contact after divergence in allopatry explains current lack of ecogeographical isolation in two hybridizing alpine plant species. Journal of Biogeography

A higher-level classification of the Pannonian and western Pontic steppe grasslands (Central and Eastern Europe). Applied Vegetation Science 20: 143–158

Molecular and karyological data confirm that the enigmatic genus Platypholis from Bonin-Islands (SE Japan) is phylogenetically nested within Orobanche (Orobanchaceae). Journal of Plant Research 130: 273–280

A novel method to infer the origin of polyploids from AFLP data reveals that the Alpine polyploid complex of Senecio carniolicus (Asteraceae) evolved mainly via autopolyploidy. Molecular Ecology Resources

Substitution of an illegitimate generic name in Hyacinthaceae, and validation of names of already described species in Ornithogalum (Hyacinthaceae) and Pinguicula (Lentibulariaceae). Phyton 56: 153–159

Mechanistic model of evolutionary rate variation en route to a nonphotosynthetic lifestyle in plants.   Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 113: 9045–9050

Taxonomy and nomenclature of the polymorphic European high mountain species Androsace vitaliana (L.) Lapeyr. (Primulaceae). PhytoKeys 75: 93–106